Classroom Supports → First Nations, Metis, and Inuit Perspectives

First Nations, Metis and Inuit Children’s Site

This is a site from Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada that offers activities, games, and stories for youth and educators about Indigenous peoples’ culture, history, and languages.

First Nations, Metis and Inuit Children’s Site

ETFO FNMI resource, “What have you heard? An introduction to the Indigenous Peoples of Canada.”

This online brochure introduces ETFO members to First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) people, the legacy of Canada’s relationship with Indigenous peoples and the move towards reconciliation. It is hyperlinked to different websites.

ETFO FNMI resource, “What have you heard? An introduction to the Indigenous Peoples of Canada.”

Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the Classroom

An educational environment that honours the culture, language and world view of the Aboriginal student is critical. Schools need to meaningfully represent and include Aboriginal people’s contributions, innovations and inventions.2 Aboriginal students require a learning environment that honours who they are and where they have come from. Follows the “Seven Living Principles”.

Integrating Aboriginal Teaching and Values into the Classroom

Ontario Curriculum Resource Guide FNMI (2016)

Supports and strengthens a curriculum that facilitates learning about contemporary and traditional First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultures and histories.

Ontario Curriculum Resource Guide FNMI

Misconceptions of Residential Schools Poster, Aboriginal Healing Foundation

This poster outlines some mistaken beliefs about residential schools and provides accurate, detailed information to refute misconceptions.

Misconceptions of Residential Schools Poster, Aboriginal Healing Foundation

Truth and Reconciliation Resources for Teachers

The residential school resource list compiled by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) includes suggestions of books, videos, websites, and news articles for a variety of ages.

Truth and Reconciliation Resources for Teachers

We Were So Far Away: The Inuit Experience of Residential Schools

We Were So Far Away presents the stories of brave Inuit residential school survivors in a virtual exhibit. Includes a timeline, and a list of suggested resources.

We Were So Far Away: The Inuit Experience of Residential Schools

We are the Children: Healing the Legacy of Residential Schools

This online exhibit explores the history and legacy of Canada’s Residential School System through Survivor stories, archival photographs, and documents to assist in promoting understanding and reconciliation in Canada about residential schools.

We are the Children: Healing the Legacy of Residential Schools

100 Years of Loss: Healing the Legacy of Residential Schools

The aim of 100 Years of Loss is to educate and create awareness and understanding about the legacy of residential schools, including the effects and intergenerational impacts on First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples, and to continue to support the ongoing healing process of Residential School Survivors. Includes an online exhibit, a timeline, testimonies of residential school survivors, video of the apology offered by Prime Minister Trudeau, and a grade levelled reading list.

100 Years of Loss: Healing the Legacy of Residential Schools

 

Through Mala’s Eyes

This series of lesson plans, built around the first-person narrative of a 12-year-old Inuk boy, will help you and your students appreciate life in the Inuit community of Salluit, in the northern part of Nunavik, Northern Quebec. Although designed for students from 9 to 12 years of age, some of the lesson plans and strategies in this unit can be adapted for other grade levels.

Through Mala’s Eyes