Resources by subject

Resources by subject

Often Occasional Teachers are called to teach a class which may not be in an area of curricular specialty. This is the section in which you will find those subject specific supports which will help you shine!

Write Where We Belong

In this unit, Grade 1 students are immersed in a variety of personally meaningful activities to further develop their ability to communicate ideas through writing, to organize information in proper sequence, and to write simple sentences using capitals and periods. This unit is designed to be taught in conjunction with or following the social studies unit, Relationships, Rules, and Responsibilities.

Write Where We Belong

Guide to Effective Instruction in Writing, Kindergarten to Grade 3 (2005)

This resource guide for teachers is published by the Ministry of Education. It was written as a practical guide for delivering an effective writing program. Some of the topics covered are: stages of writing development, becoming an effective writer, teaching writing to ELL students, and assessment and evaluation. Each instructional approach chapter also contains at least one sample lesson plan.

Guide to Effective Instruction in Writing, Kindergarten to Grade 3, 2005

Role Cards for Literature Circles

These reproducible role cards briefly explain each literature circle member’s role and there are prompts for each member to respond to when they participate in the discussion.

Role Cards for Literature Circles

Anchor Chart for ‘Just Right’ Texts

This chart explains the five-finger method for choosing a book. When trying to select a book a student should open the book to a random page and begin reading. If he or she comes across five words they do not understand then the book is too difficult.

Anchor Chart for ‘Just Right’ Texts

Early Reading Strategy Grades K-3, Expert Panel Report (2003)

This Ministry of Education report was written by the Expert Panel on Early Reading. Its purpose is to provide a practical guide for building an effective reading program.  It begins by discussing what effective reading instruction entails. It also provides instructional strategies for teaching phonics, read aloud, shared reading, guided reading, comprehension, and independent reading. Other topics such as assessment and evaluation and help for children with reading difficulties are also covered. There is a glossary and suggested reading list at the back of the report.

Early Reading Strategy Grades K-3, Expert Panel Report (2003)

Content Literacy

This document from the Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat’s Research into Practice series addresses the question: how can we teach content literacy to elementary students? It discusses the challenges that students face when it comes to reading informational texts that contain vocabulary and concepts that are foreign to them. The author presents teaching strategies and tips to assist teachers in helping students to overcome those challenges.

Content Literacy

Learning Blocks for Literacy and Numeracy

This article, from the Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat’s ‘Reasearch into Practice’ series discusses the importance of having 100-120 minute blocks for literacy learning and 60-70 minute blocks for numeracy learning. Emphasis is placed on the fact that learning blocks allow for differentiated learning. The author also suggests tips for planning a classroom timetable in addition to outlining a sample instructional sequence for learning blocks.

Learning Blocks for Literacy and Numeracy

Balanced Literacy Diagram

This diagram shows the main components of balanced literacy program as well as the main features of each component.

Balanced Literacy Diagram

 

Using Bloom’s Taxonomy in Reading Instruction

This is a one-page graphic representation of how to connect Bloom’s Taxonomy with reading instruction.

Using Bloom’s Taxonomy in Reading Instruction

The Ontario Curriculum Exemplars Grade 1-8 Writing (1999)

The Ontario Curriculum Exemplars are intended to provide a model for planning, assessing, and improving student work across Ontario. The exemplars give Ontario teachers the opportunity to view graded student work that is based on tasks that were designed with the curriculum expectations in mind and assessed according to the four levels of achievement outlined in the curriculum. The specific goals behind publishing the exemplars are: to show examples of student work at each of the four levels of achievement; to work toward consistency in assessment across the province; to demonstrate an approach to student learning that is based on clear criteria; and to highlight the links between the curriculum expectations and assessment.

Ontario Curriculum Writing Exemplars Grade 1-8